Apis

Apis, an Egyptian bull god, was the personification of the creator god Ptah in Memphis. He is an intermediary between the supreme god and human beings. His mother Isis could engender him in a lightening flash. The bull is depicted as being totally black, except for the small white triangle on its forehead, and having … Read more

Thoth

Thoth (also Toth) , scribe of the Egyptian gods, was the chief deity of Khmun, or Hermopolis. He was conceived as either having the head of an ibis or of a bamboo. Thoth is usually depicted as an ibis-headed man with a pen-and-ink holder.   He became known as the god of: The foundation of … Read more

Tefnut

Tefnut, primordial Egyptian goddess of moisture, is one of the first nine deities in the Heliopolitan Theological System. According to the genealogy of the priests of Heliopolis, she was created from the breath or saliva of the creator sun god Atum. She is the sister/consort of Su, and mother of Geb and Nut. Her main cult sanctuary was in Heliopolis. … Read more

Seth

Seth (or Set) was among the first nine deities in the Heliopolitan Theological System, probably originating from Libya, whose followers appeared to have worshipped him under crocodile and hippopotamus fetishes. At first they were centered in Upper Egypt but later spread throughout the country. There seemed to be no rivalry between the cults of Osiris and Isis and his cult, perhaps … Read more

Seshat

Seshat, a very ancient goddess who was believed to be the sister and more commonly the wife of Thoth, was the deity of writing and measurement until such functions were ascribed to her husband. She was called the “Lady of Books,” or celestial librarian, and was the patroness also of arithmetic, architecture and records, although she … Read more

Sefkhet-Abwy

Sefkhet-Abwy, in egyptian mythology also known as she who has seven horns, was the Egyptian goddess of libraries and writing. Probably a form of Seshat. She was depicted in human form as bearing a seven-point star or rosette on her head below a bow-shaped object. A.G.H. Source: Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, … Read more