About Us

The Mystica is an online encyclopedia from 1997.

Staff

Editorial Department
Owner-Editor
Alan G. Hefner

Research Department Alan G. Hefner

Graphics Micha F. Lindemans

Advisory Board

Special Counsultant
Micha F. Lindemans

James Dilworth

Staff Writers

James Dilworth
Alan G. Hefner, A.G.H.

 

Overview

There are over 3000 articles presented. Initially this volume seemed small to other on-line encyclopedias, but the encyclopedia’s objectives are not small, they still are universal. The first objective is to objectively describe past and present ideas, concepts, beliefs, and practices in the worlds of the occult, mysticism and paranormal. By doing this, the MYSTICA hopes to achieve its second objective, which is to educate. To many people the regions of the occult and mysticism are strange, and often even thought to be sinister. But when the truth about these phenomena is revealed they are usually seen and understood differently. Also the practitioners of such phenomena may be seen differently too. They usually appear to be ordinary people holding different ideas.

As the encyclopedia developed other sections were opened. The newest of these sections in the encyclopedia is “Hinduism,” which attempts to describe and explain the practices and beliefs of the Hindus, as well as showing relationships between the religion and occult and mysticism.

The encyclopedia intends to have a writing section named the Mystical Enchantments. This section will contain public announcements and information about sites and events concerning the worlds of the occult, mysticism and paranormal in cyberspace. It will also house poems and short works as submitted by visitors. This is an area for personal experiences, feelings and views. Short works such as invocations, blessings and poetry will be considered too, but when from another source the source must be given.

Lastly, and perhaps most of all, the MYSTICA hopes to be entertaining. Knowledge just for its own sake usually does not mean much or do much for the visitor, but if the visitor finds an idea or practice which he likes and wants to explore it further or revisit the encyclopedia, then the encyclopedia’s purpose has be fully achieved. Visitors can also ask for further information on a particular topic or related topics even not yet in the encyclopedia by using the feedback option.

Some of the topics you will find here, are about:

  • Akashic Records: What are they and how are they presently used by psychics and average persons?
  • Francis Bacon: Was he just an English poet, essayist, and statesman? Or, was he of royalty? How did his occult ideas influence England and even America?
  • Druidism: What was this strange religion which held the ancient Celtic people together. Who were the Celts and how did they live? Why are remnants of the religion still practiced today?
  • Reincarnation and Karma: Why are these two beliefs so important to some persons? Why do they base their lives around them?
  • Voodoo: What is the origin of this religion?

These and other questions are answered in the encyclopedia which is far from complete. New articles will be added regularly. Visitors are invited to return to view the new additions. Visitors are also invited and encouraged to submit articles of their own which will make the encyclopedia grow faster. Rules for submission of articles appear on the main menu. There are just a few of us working on this project, so all help and feedback are graciously accepted.

Finally, the MYSTICA, like her new sister-site Mythical-Folk on the MYSTICA.ORG will be always opened to everyone and forever free.

 

Awards

Name: Spirit And Sky Top Site Award 2004

Date: February 4, 2004

Awarded by: Spiritual Directories http://www.spiritandsky.com

Criteria: On-topic and informative for the category it is in


Name: Reality Shifting Award of Excellence.

Date: September 20, 2003

Awarded by: http://realityshifters.com/

Criteria: Your Mystica web site demonstrates excellence in content and design, while being informative and unique, and helping people shift their reality in a positive direction.


Recognition: Selected as an approved site for an educational Internet service called WebPathExpress. This exciting service, developed by the Follett Software Company, helps students find online resources for homework assignments, reports and other areas of research. http://www.fsc.follett.com/products/webpathexpress

Date: February 26, 2002

Criteria: In an effort to point students to the best resources on the Internet, we have selected
https://www.themystica.com as one that provides excellent educational value.


Name: Star of Wisdom Award

Date: March 2, 2001

Awarded by: Astral Hearts at http://astralhearts.com

Criteria: The Star of Wisdom is given to websites which promote spiritual wisdom on the Internet in all areas of spiritual and personal growth. Presentation of content, and graphic design are also considered in selecting from nominees presented by individuals and Astral Hearts staff members.


Recognition:We are glad to announce that the page with this URL:

The Mystica – Online Encyclopedia Definitions, Mythology, Religion, Occultism


has been included in Länkskafferiet (the Link Larder) [http://lankskafferiet.skolverket.se/]. The Link Larder is a database for educational use which consists of subject structured and quality
assessed Internet information resources chosen for Swedish pupils, especially those between 10 and 15 years of age.

The Link Larder is a part of the Swedish Schoolnet http://www.skolverket.se/skolnet/english/index.html] and was comissioned by and has continuing support from the National Agency for Education.

Date: December 11, 2000


Recognition: Submission to Academic Resources Channel

Date: August 5, 2000

Criteria: In recognition of your remarkable network achievements, the information
about your online work has been published in selected issues of the RSCI
Journals Collection.


Name: Britannica Internet Guide Award

Date: February 1, 2000

Awarded by: Britannica.com

Criteria: Editors selected site as one of the best on the Internet for quality, accuracy of content, presentation and usability.


Name: ***”IAS & MANJUSHRI MANDALA KINDNESS REWARD 1999″***

Date: December 14, 1999

Awarded by: INSTITUTE FOR ASTROENERGETIC STUDIES/IAS
& MANJUSHRI-MANDALA (Established 1975)

Criteria: – For your kindness of awarding our page, giving us a banner-link or
some other web-kindness or just because we like your outstanding site
we reward you with the unique ***”IAS & MANJUSHRI MANDALA KINDNESS
REWARD 1999″***. This is not an award one can apply for. May this
Tibetan dragon-king (drug dru) grant you even more wisdom, energy,
success, health, prosperity and esp. a long life. –


Name: Recommended Site for February ’99

Awarded by: Aternate Realities in Art and Thought

Criteria: Granted for providing an extraordinary service to the Esoteric/Occult/Magickal communities on the web.


Awarded by: newhoo.comA Search Engine

Date: September 07, 1998

Area: Reference, Encyclopedia: Subject-Encyclopedias: Paranormal


Awarded by: Eye On the Web

Date: May 07, 1998

Area: Religion & Philosophy: New Age/Paganism sub-category

Criteria: Based on content, usability, graphics and overall design.


Awarded by: AvatarSearch–SearchEngine of the Occult Internet

Date: March 10, 1998

Criteria: The Mystic Site of the Web Award exists exclusively for the benefit of the Mystical and Occult Communities on the Internet. Its sole purpose is to provide a means of recognition for a Web Site’s Achievement and service to the community.

 

MYTHICAL-FOLK

This is an online encyclopedia containing subjects of mythology and folklore, thus came the title MYTHICAL-FOLK. Mythology and folklore are related as can be seen in the description of the Hindu god Krishna. The name Krishna has various derivations, two of which are prominently associated with this god. The first comes from the Sanskrit krs (to drag, to give pain).

In this sense Krishna symbolizes the Kali Yoga, and the Age of Suffering. The second derivation of Krishna is “black,” both currently and in the Vedas. It is thought that Krishna originally came from the black Hindu society that the white Aryans conquered.

Therefore, he, or whoever was the real person or persons that gradually developed this persona, was from the dasa (servant or slave) caste, and from which evolved two characterizations. One was Krishna, the pre-Aryan hero. Even though he had not been of the brahmin caste, the Brahmins adopted the image of Krishna as a warrior to help enforce their domination over the castes below them.

His second characterization was that of Krishna, the lowly cowherd. This was the persona by which the populace most loved and worshipped him. People loved him as the low-caste cowboy living among a pastoral clan by the river Yamuna because they could identify with his humanity.

It was mainly in this latter form, with many tales composing its formation, that Krishna was incorporated into the Hindu pantheon along with many other pre-Aryan deities. As can be seen, throughout the centuries folklore and mythology emerged inseparably into one belief of a god.

As it has been shown, the stories of human men inevitably become so entwined, or interwoven, that the form beliefs of gods. For Plato, who is the first known user of the term mythologia that meant no more than story telling, which were usually about legendary figures.

This definition fitted into Greek mythology quite appropriately because the characters in the stories were not just gods, but included a vast numbers of heroes such as the most famous Hercules, Jason, and Theseus. Hercules, for example, may have undertaken the twelve Herculean Labors because of the goddess Hera’s animosity toward him, but his superhuman exploits fell short of genuine divinity; his divinity came from the stories told about him and his reception on Mount Olympus by the gods and goddesses, especially Hera with who he reacted his birth and she gave her daughter Hebe to him in marriage.

Even those many of the stories or myths are about supernatural gods and superhuman beings certain characteristics are advertently seen throughout them, the human strengths and weakness. These characteristics made the myths so enduring to the people. The gods and heroes were like themselves, but overcame adversity or at times failed when confronting it. Krishna was the admired young warrior whom some used for their own advantage; he also was the lowly cowboy whom many could identify with. Hercules was the symbol of strength, the man who performed superhuman feats but also suffered enormous adversities. There was the god Apollo, another son of Zeus, who showed his strength be establishing his oracle at Delphi but had to maintain it against his brother Hercules who challenged him. Here is shown an exhibition of rivaling siblings that existed in Grecian times. Among the lovers of Apollo were both men, or youth, and women, thus indicating homosexuality was present in Grecian society, if not accepted. The practice was seen in their gods. So was chastity, as both Apollo’s twin sister Artemis and her sister Athena
remained virgin goddesses. In the society was also incest. Hera, Zeus’ final wife, was also his sister.

Currently there are many in the world who do not hold to the premise that god, capitalized or not-makes no difference, made man; for them this premise has became the first part of the question: Did god make man, or did man make god? Based upon the previous discussion of mythology the latter portion of the question seems to hold true. The encyclopedia MYTHICAL-FOLK does not try to definitively answer this question, but it does definitely present evidence that supports the notion that most people in myths and otherwise have portrayed their gods in characterization according to themselves. As the occultist Dion Fortune phrased it: The true nature of the gods, she said, is that of magical images shaped out of the astral plane by mankind’s thoughts, and is influenced by the mind. There are several reasons for such a presentation. Two of them are understanding, which hopefully included open-minded awareness, and education.

It is difficult to say which precedes the other, understanding or education; to many the two are inseparable in order to reach a nonjudgmental perception of mythology and history. Historical understanding is definitely included in mythology, for if people characterize their gods according to themselves, then the people themselves are characterized. The observer, the student and reader of mythology, must be trained, or self-trained, to be nonjudgmental; in short, accept everything that he observes as objectively as ones accepts the simple mathematical equation 2 times 2 equals 4. When accepting what one observes as fact, no matter how different it may be from one’s own personal beliefs, one can use this observation to gather further information just as the simple mathematical equation can be used to do higher mathematics. Each becomes a steppingstone to something else. As one comes to understand, in the study of mythology there is no room for judgment, as will be shown later. A judgment, considering something wrong or incorrect if it does not agree with one’s personal value system, will almost surely hinder the person’s understanding and research. Whatever has been done in the past must be accepted as fact. As a classical literature professor once said, “Don’t try to put Christianity on the ancient Greeks, it doesn’t work.” Still one may question or examine the reasons that people held such beliefs, which usually leads to further discovered information.

This further discovered information is another reason for the encyclopedia’s presentation of mythology and folklore. The encyclopedia will endeavor to illustrate ways in which others are currently using such information toward self-fulfillment especially in the areas of occultism and mysticism. One example of this is seen in the adoration of the goddess Hecate, the Hellenes emphasized her Crone aspects, but continued to worship her at places where three roads connected, especially in rites of magic, divination, and consulting with the dead. Offerings, particularly on nights of the full moon, were left at roadside shrines built in her honor, especially by those wishing this goddess of prophecy and magic to assist them on journeys. This latter aspect of worship to and petitioning of the goddess is rather interesting when one remembers many Roman Catholics once prayed to St. Christopher for a safe journey when traveling; a particular belief in the help of the supernatural seems to continue throughout the ages.

The study of mythology and folklore also gives one different views on life. For example, when realizing the modern occultist Aleister Crowley, and others, prayed to the Egyptian sun god Re one recognizes that even in current times the belief systems of others vary. What might be sacrilegious within one system might be approved of in another, which does not mean one is right while the other is wrong when both are observed with a nonjudgmental attitude. This also holds true for various aspects found in mythology such as homosexuality and incest found among the Greek gods. It indicates morality among ancient civilizations was different than present morality, these things were more acceptable, or seem to be. By applying the findings of mythological study to oneself, one can broaden one’s point of view, which is another objective the encyclopedia wishes to help the visitor accomplish.

Lastly, and perhaps most of all, the MYTHICAL-FOLK hopes to be entertaining. Knowledge just for its own sake usually does not mean much or do much for the visitor, but if the visitor finds an idea or practice which he likes and wants to explore it further or revisit the encyclopedia, then the encyclopedia’s purpose has be fully achieved. Visitors can also ask for further information on a particular topic or related topics even not yet in the encyclopedia by using the feedback option.

Finally, the Mystical-Folk, like her sister-site the MYSTICA on the MYSTICA.ORG will be always opened to everyone and forever free.

 

The Mystica

There are over 890 articles presented. Initially this volume seemed small
to other on-line encyclopedias, but the encyclopedia’s objectives are not
small, they still are universal. The first objective is to objectively
describe past and present ideas, concepts, beliefs, and practices in the
worlds of the occult, mysticism and paranormal. By doing this, the MYSTICA
hopes to achieve its second objective, which is to educate. To many people
the regions of the occult and mysticism are strange, and often even
thought to be sinister. But when the truth about these phenomena is
revealed they are usually seen and understood differently. Also the
practitioners of such phenomena may be seen differently too. They usually
appear to be ordinary people holding different ideas.

As the encyclopedia developed other sections were opened. The newest of
these sections in the encyclopedia is “Hinduism,” which attempts to
describe and explain the practices and beliefs of the Hindus, as well as
showing relationships between the religion and occult and mysticism.

The section of “Great Mysteries” contains places where occult and
mystical occurrences have happened such as Atlantis,
Avebury, Stonehenge,
the Rollright Stones
and other mystical phenomena. By describing such places it is hope to
acquaint the visitor with the environment surrounding such phenomena.

Another area that was opened the paranormal section dealing with the
occurrences of psychic phenomena such as ESP
(extrasensory
perception), Kirlian
photography, and Psychokinesis
(PK).

The encyclopedia intends to have a writing
section named the Mystical Enchantments. This section will contain public
announcements and information about sites and events concerning the worlds
of the occult, mysticism and paranormal in cyberspace. It will also house
poems and short works as submitted by visitors. This is an area for
personal experiences, feelings and views. Short works such as invocations,
blessings and poetry will be considered too, but when from another source
the source must be given.

Lastly, and perhaps most of all, the MYSTICA hopes to be entertaining.
Knowledge just for its own sake usually does not mean much or do much for
the visitor, but if the visitor finds an idea or practice which he likes
and wants to explore it further or revisit the encyclopedia, then the
encyclopedia’s purpose has be fully achieved. Visitors can also ask for
further information on a particular topic or related topics even not yet
in the encyclopedia by using the feedback option.

Copyright

FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.

For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

If you are the owner of an article, logo, banner or picture and want it removed, just email me at [email protected] and I will delete or rewrite it.

However, you do not need my permission to link to this web site.

Click to rate this post!
[Total: 0 Average: 0]