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Queen of Sheba


When the Queen of Sheba, in her kingdom, heard of the great King Solomon, and all she was told he possessed, she decided to go herself to discover if it was true. She journeyed to Jerusalem by camel caravan bringing with her much gold and precious stones. She exposed her heart to Solomon, asking him many hard questions. He answered all of her questions; not one thing was hidden from the king which he did not answer. The queen heard all the king's wisdom, and saw his splendor in the house that he had built, the food of his table, the setting of his servants, the attendance of his ministers in their apparel, his cupbearers, and his ascent by which he went up to the house of the Lord.

After seeing all of this there was no more spirit left in her. Completely convinced, she told Solomon that the report which she had heard in her land of his acts and wisdom was true. She confessed that she could not believe it until she had seen it herself.

She then praised him saying, "Blessed be the Lord thy God, who delighted in thee, to sit thee on the throne of Israel. Because the Lord who loved Israel forever, therefore he made thee king to execute justice and righteousness (1 Kings 10:9).

Then the queen gave Solomon one hundred and twenty talents of gold, an extreme abundance of spices, and precious stones. In return the king gave the Queen of Sheba all she desired, whatsoever she asked for, beside that which Solomon gave her of his royal bounty. She returned to her land with her servants (1 Kings 10:1-13).

For a long time many Biblical scholars thought the episode between the Queen of Sheba and King Solomon was just a romantic tale. However, there is appearing historical evidence of the Queen of Sheba as well as archeological finds which adds substance to the creditability of the story. Besides, their two kingdoms were situated in the proximity of the once famous spice route. A.G.H.


Source:

Unger, Merrill F., Unger's Bible Dictionary, Chicago, Moody Press, 1966, pp. 1036-1037