Back to Home Page or Contents Page or Rituals and Texts or Index

Arignote


This is an ancient ghost tale related by the second century writer Lucian. The story, as he told it, concerned a certain house in Corinth, in the Cranaus quarter, that no one would inhabit because it was haunted by a spectre. A man by the name of Aragonite, well versed in the lore of Egyptian magical books, shut himself in the house to pass the night. He went to the court for some peaceful reading. Soon the spectre appeared, and in order to frighten Arignote he first took the form of a dog, then that of a bull, and finally that of a lion. But Arignote was not disturbed. He admonished the spectre with a magic spell which he found in one of his books, and then obliged the spectre to retreat to a corner where it disappeared. On the following day, the spot to which the spectre had retreated was dug up and a skeleton was discovered. After proper burial the ghost was not seen again. This anecdote is an adaptation of the adventure of Athenodorus which Lucian had read in Pliny. A.G.H.


Source: 9.

Home    Alchemy    Ancient Beliefs    Buddhism    Christianity    Demonology    Divination    Goddess and witchcraft    Great Mysteries    Hinduism    Islam     Judaism    Magic    Neo-paganism    Other    Paranormal    Past and present Beliefs    People    Religions and sects    Rituals and texts    Shamanism    Stones    Theosophy African Mythology    Asian Mythology    Buddha Mythology    Egyptian Mythology    Greco-Roman Mythology    Greek Mythology    Hindu Mythology    Native American    Persian Mythology    Roman Mythology    South American Mythology