Vaya


Vaya, the wind, is said to have originated in Hindu (India) as the god of winds. He was worshipped from around 1700 BC to the present. Vaya is one of the most important deities in the Vedas, including the Rg Veda. In later Hinduism he evolves into a dikpala, guardian of the northwestern quarter. Also, he is depicted in some texts as a chariot driver for the god Agni. His color is dark blue and attributes are the arrow, hook, prayer wheel, staff, and water jar.

Vaya also is in the Buddhist pantheon as a dikpala, guardian of the northwestern quarter. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 280

Vasita

 


Vasita, will power, is the generic title of twelve Buddhist goddesses personifying the disciplines which result in spiritual regeneration. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 279

Vajradhatvisvari

 


Vajradhatvisvari, Buddhist Goddess, the lady of the adamantine world, is the Shakti of Vairocana and also a variety of Marici. Her attributes are many including an image of Vairocana on the crown. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 276

Vajradaka

 


Vajradaka, Buddhist God (Mahayana), is an emanation of Aksobhya bearing one, three or four heads. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 276

Vairocana

 


Vairocana, coming from the sun, is the oldest dhyanibuddha, or meditation buddha, originated in India. He is one of five mystic spiritual counterparts of the human buddha in Vajrayana Buddhism; a product of Adibuddha who represents the branch of the cosmos concerned with the bodily form. His origination is from the white mantra syllable OM and lives in the highest paradise. His icon is usually placed in the innermost part of a stupa or shrine. His Shakti is Vajradhatvisvari and he is normally accompanied by a lion or two dragons. His color is white, and attributes are three monkish robes and the prayer wheel. When honored as the tutelary god, in Lamaism, of Tibet his attributes include the bell and prayer wheel. He possesses several emanations. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 276

Usnisa

 


Usnisa, Buddhist god, is a dikpala or guardian of the upward direction. This is also a collective term for a group of eight deities, including Usnisa, who are perceived as extensions of the dhyanibuddhas.

Additionally the word also describes a type of curled hairstyle found in the characteristic iconography of buddhas. The color is yellow, and attributes include the jewel, lotus, prayer wheel, and sword, and may be three-headed. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 273

Sakyamuni

 


Sakyamuni, the sage of the Sakyas, a BuddhistLamaist (Tibet) god, is the historical buddha, known mainly from Tibet. His color is golden and attribute is a bowl. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 225

Ratnosnisa

 


Ratnosnisa, Buddhist god, is an usnisa deity apparently connected to the guardian of the sky deities or dikpalas in the southern direction. His color is blue. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 219

Ratnolka

 


Ratnolka, jewel meteor, is the Buddhist goddess of light and the deification of literature.
She is one of a group of dharanis; her color is yellow and attribute is a jeweled staff. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, p. 219

Ratnasambhava

 


Ratnasambhava, Buddhism, born of a jewel, is the third dhyanibuddha, or meditation buddha; worshipped from around 500 BC to present. He is one of five mystic spiritual counterparts of the human buddha in Vajrayana Buddhism; a product of Adibuddha who represents the branch of the cosmos concerned with sensation. He originates from the yellow mantra TRAM and lives in the southern paradise. He is the head of a group of deities who carry jewels and are family symbols. His Shakti is Mamaki and he is usually accompanied by two lions or horses. His color is yellow, and attributes are a jewel and three monkish robes. Ratnasambhava is also taken as a tutelary god in Lamaism (Tibet) and attributes include a bell, and a jewel. He has many emanations. A.G.H.


Source:

Jordan, Michael, Encyclopedia of Gods, New York, Facts On File, Inc. 1993, pp. 218-219